Be your pet’s hero. Vaccinations for longer, happier lives.

Be your pet’s hero. Vaccinations for longer, happier lives.

Don’t Wait. Vaccinate.

We love every single pet who walks through our doors like our own. That is why we are such passionate proponents of vaccines. This is a safe and cost-effective way to keep your pet from being harmed by different dangerous pathogens. We break vaccinations down into two categories: Core and Non-Core. All pets are required to receive Core vaccines (such as Rabies). Non-Core vaccines are recommended based on unique lifestyle or risk factors.

For example, for a larger dog that goes on hikes or frequents lakes, Dr. Anderson would recommend a lepto and rattlesnake vaccine on top of the Core vaccinations of DHP, Bordatella and Rabies.

To keep your pet up to date, Doctors and staff at Otay Pet Vets have a vaccine schedule that is broken up by core pet vaccines and non-core vaccines. Core pet vaccinations are those recommended for every pet, while non-core vaccines may be advised based on your pet’s lifestyle. We recommend some non-core vaccines based on you and your pets environment and activities.

Example: A larger dog going hiking or in lakes – Dr. Anderson would recommend a lepto and a rattlesnake vaccine on top of the core- DHP, Bordetella and Rabies.

Your pets health and happiness is dependent upon you keeping them properly vaccinated! We are open 7 days a week and can get you in quickly.

Don’t Wait. Vaccinate.

We love every single pet who walks through our doors like our own. That is why we are such passionate proponents of vaccines. This is a safe and cost-effective way to keep your pet from being harmed by different dangerous pathogens. We break vaccinations down into two categories: Core and Non-Core. All pets are required to receive Core vaccines (such as Rabies). Non-Core vaccines are recommended based on unique lifestyle or risk factors.

For example, for a larger dog that goes on hikes or frequents lakes, Dr. Anderson would recommend a lepto and rattlesnake vaccine on top of the Core vaccinations of DHP, Bordatella and Rabies.

To keep your pet up to date, Doctors and staff at Otay Pet Vets have a vaccine schedule that is broken up by core pet vaccines and non-core vaccines. Core pet vaccinations are those recommended for every pet, while non-core vaccines may be advised based on your pet’s lifestyle. We recommend some non-core vaccines based on you and your pets environment and activities.

Example: A larger dog going hiking or in lakes – Dr. Anderson would recommend a lepto and a rattlesnake vaccine on top of the core- DHP, Bordetella and Rabies.

Your pets health and happiness is dependent upon you keeping them properly vaccinated! We are open 7 days a week and can get you in quickly.

Vaccination Schedules

Dog VaccineInitial Puppy Vaccination (at or under 16 weeks)Initial Adult Dog Vaccination (over 16 weeks)Booster RecommendationComments
Rabies 1st initial and 3-yearCan be administered as one dose, as early as 4 months of age. States regulate the age at which it is first administered.Single doseA second vaccination is required after the initial or the 1st rabies vaccine- 1 year, then boosters every 3 years.Core dog vaccine.
DistemperAt least 3 doses, given between 6 and 16 weeks of age2 doses, given 3-4 weeks apartPuppies need a booster 1 year after completing their initial series, then all dogs need a booster every 3 years or more often.Core dog vaccine. Caused by an airborne virus, distemper is a severe disease that, among other problems, may cause permanent brain damage.
ParvovirusAt least 3 doses, given between 6 and 16 weeks of age2 doses, 3-4 weeks apartPuppies need a booster 1 year after completing the initial series, then all dogs need a booster every 3 years or more often.Core dog vaccine. Canine “parvo” is contagious, and can cause severe vomiting and bloody diarrhea. Parvo is usually fatal if untreated.
Adenovirus (canine hepatitis)At least 3 doses, between 6 and 16 weeks of age2 doses, 3-4 weeks apartPuppies need a booster 1 year after completing the initial series, then all dogs need a booster every 3 years or more often.Core dog vaccine. Spread via coughs and sneezes, canine hepatitis can lead to severe liver damage, and death.
ParainfluenzaAdministered at 6-8 weeks of age, then every 3-4 weeks until 12-14 weeks old1 doseA booster may be necessary after 1 year, depending on manufacturer recommendations; revaccination every 3 years is considered protective.Non-core dog vaccine. Parainfluenza infection results in cough, fever. It may be associated with Bordetella infection.
Bordetella bronchiseptica (kennel cough)Depends on the vaccine type; 2 doses are usually needed for protection.1 dose of the intranasal or oral product, or 2 doses of the injected productAnnual or 6-month boosters may be recommended for dogs in high-risk environments.Non-core dog vaccine. Not usually a serious condition, although it can be dangerous in young puppies. It is usually seen after activities like boarding or showing.
Lyme disease1 dose, administered as early as 9 weeks, with a second dose 2-4 weeks later2 doses, 2-4 weeks apartMay be needed annually, prior to the start of tick season or if pet will travel to the East coast or tick areaNon-core dog vaccine. Generally recommended only for dogs with a high risk for exposure to Lyme disease-carrying ticks.
LeptospirosisFirst dose at 12 weeks; second dose 4 weeks later2 doses, 2-4 weeks apartAt least once yearly for dogs in high-risk areasNon-core dog vaccine. Vaccination is generally restricted to established risk areas. Exposure to rodents and standing water can lead to a leptospirosis infection.
Canine influenzaFirst dose as early as 6-8 weeks; second dose 2-4 weeks later2 doses, 2-4 weeks apartYearlyNon-core dog vaccine.

Similar to bordetella.

RattlesnakeFirst dose as early as 4 months old2 doses 4 weeks apartYearly update in early springNon-core dog vaccine
Cat VaccineInitial Kitten Vaccination (at or under 16 weeks)Initial Adult Cat Vaccination (over 16 weeks)Booster RecommendationComments
RabiesSingle dose as early as 4 months of age, Revaccinate 1 year later and then every 3 years2 doses, 12 months apartRequired every 3 years, after initial or the 1st 1 year rabies vaccine.Core cat vaccine. Rabies is 100% fatal to cats, with no treatment available. Prevention is key.
Feline Distemper (Panleukopenia)As early as 6 weeks, then every 3-4 weeks until 16 weeks of age.2 doses, 3-4 weeks apart1 dose is given a year after the last dose of the initial series, then every 3 years.Core cat vaccine. Feline distemper is a severe contagious disease that most commonly strikes kittens and can cause death.
Feline HerpesvirusAs early as 6 weeks, then every 3-4 weeks until 16 weeks of age2 doses, 3-4 weeks apart1 dose is given a year after the last dose of the initial series, then every 3 years.Core cat vaccine. Feline herpesvirus causes feline viral rhinotracheitis (FVR), a very contagious upper respiratory condition.
CalicivirusAs early as 6 weeks, then every 3-4 weeks until 16 weeks of age2 doses, 3-4 weeks apart1 dose is given a year after the last dose of the initial series, then every 3 years.Core cat vaccine. A very contagious upper respiratory condition that can cause joint pain, oral ulcerations, fever, and anorexia.
Feline Leukemia Virus (FeLV)As early as 8 weeks, then 3-4 weeks later2 doses, 3-4 weeks apart1 dose is given a year after the last dose of the initial series, then annuallyNon-core cat vaccine.

Should test FeLV negative first. Transmitted via cat-to-cat contact. Can cause cancer, immunosuppressant

BordetellaAt 8 weeks, then 2-4 weeks later2 doses, 2-4 weeks apartAnnuallyNon-core cat vaccine.

A contagious upper respiratory condition

Does your pet’s rabies vaccine contain mercury?
Hint: If they get it at Otay Pet Vets, nope!

Did you know that the vast majority of veterinarians and virtually all vaccine clinics use rabies vaccines that contain mercury? Thimerosal is a mercury-based compound that is used as a vaccine preservative. In people and animals, mercury toxicity can cause nausea; vomiting; fatigue; difficulty walking; tremors; attention deficit; brain, lung, and kidney damage; and, at higher doses, coma and death. Mercury builds up in the body so the adverse effects of mercury are cumulative over the life of your pet.

Our primary goal is to help you to keep your beloved animal family members as healthy and happy as possible. That’s why we only use mercury-free rabies vaccines at Otay Pet Vets. Regardless of where you get your pets vaccinated, for the health of your pet, please don’t accept any rabies vaccine that contains thimerosal! If the label on the rabies vaccine does not have the designation ‘TF’ for thimerosal-free, then the vaccine contains mercury and should be avoided.

Vaccination Schedules

Dog VaccineInitial Puppy Vaccination (at or under 16 weeks)Initial Adult Dog Vaccination (over 16 weeks)Booster RecommendationComments
Rabies 1st initial and 3-yearCan be administered as one dose, as early as 4 months of age. States regulate the age at which it is first administered.Single doseA second vaccination is required after the initial or the 1st rabies vaccine- 1 year, then boosters every 3 years.Core dog vaccine.
DistemperAt least 3 doses, given between 6 and 16 weeks of age2 doses, given 3-4 weeks apartPuppies need a booster 1 year after completing their initial series, then all dogs need a booster every 3 years or more often.Core dog vaccine. Caused by an airborne virus, distemper is a severe disease that, among other problems, may cause permanent brain damage.
ParvovirusAt least 3 doses, given between 6 and 16 weeks of age2 doses, 3-4 weeks apartPuppies need a booster 1 year after completing the initial series, then all dogs need a booster every 3 years or more often.Core dog vaccine. Canine “parvo” is contagious, and can cause severe vomiting and bloody diarrhea. Parvo is usually fatal if untreated.
Adenovirus (canine hepatitis)At least 3 doses, between 6 and 16 weeks of age2 doses, 3-4 weeks apartPuppies need a booster 1 year after completing the initial series, then all dogs need a booster every 3 years or more often.Core dog vaccine. Spread via coughs and sneezes, canine hepatitis can lead to severe liver damage, and death.
ParainfluenzaAdministered at 6-8 weeks of age, then every 3-4 weeks until 12-14 weeks old1 doseA booster may be necessary after 1 year, depending on manufacturer recommendations; revaccination every 3 years is considered protective.Non-core dog vaccine. Parainfluenza infection results in cough, fever. It may be associated with Bordetella infection.
Bordetella bronchiseptica (kennel cough)Depends on the vaccine type; 2 doses are usually needed for protection.1 dose of the intranasal or oral product, or 2 doses of the injected productAnnual or 6-month boosters may be recommended for dogs in high-risk environments.Non-core dog vaccine. Not usually a serious condition, although it can be dangerous in young puppies. It is usually seen after activities like boarding or showing.
Lyme disease1 dose, administered as early as 9 weeks, with a second dose 2-4 weeks later2 doses, 2-4 weeks apartMay be needed annually, prior to the start of tick season or if pet will travel to the East coast or tick areaNon-core dog vaccine. Generally recommended only for dogs with a high risk for exposure to Lyme disease-carrying ticks.
LeptospirosisFirst dose at 12 weeks; second dose 4 weeks later2 doses, 2-4 weeks apartAt least once yearly for dogs in high-risk areasNon-core dog vaccine. Vaccination is generally restricted to established risk areas. Exposure to rodents and standing water can lead to a leptospirosis infection.
Canine influenzaFirst dose as early as 6-8 weeks; second dose 2-4 weeks later2 doses, 2-4 weeks apartYearlyNon-core dog vaccine.

Similar to bordetella.

RattlesnakeFirst dose as early as 4 months old2 doses 4 weeks apartYearly update in early springNon-core dog vaccine
Cat VaccineInitial Kitten Vaccination (at or under 16 weeks)Initial Adult Cat Vaccination (over 16 weeks)Booster RecommendationComments
RabiesSingle dose as early as 4 months of age, Revaccinate 1 year later and then every 3 years2 doses, 12 months apartRequired every 3 years, after initial or the 1st 1 year rabies vaccine.Core cat vaccine. Rabies is 100% fatal to cats, with no treatment available. Prevention is key.
Feline Distemper (Panleukopenia)As early as 6 weeks, then every 3-4 weeks until 16 weeks of age.2 doses, 3-4 weeks apart1 dose is given a year after the last dose of the initial series, then every 3 years.Core cat vaccine. Feline distemper is a severe contagious disease that most commonly strikes kittens and can cause death.
Feline HerpesvirusAs early as 6 weeks, then every 3-4 weeks until 16 weeks of age2 doses, 3-4 weeks apart1 dose is given a year after the last dose of the initial series, then every 3 years.Core cat vaccine. Feline herpesvirus causes feline viral rhinotracheitis (FVR), a very contagious upper respiratory condition.
CalicivirusAs early as 6 weeks, then every 3-4 weeks until 16 weeks of age2 doses, 3-4 weeks apart1 dose is given a year after the last dose of the initial series, then every 3 years.Core cat vaccine. A very contagious upper respiratory condition that can cause joint pain, oral ulcerations, fever, and anorexia.
Feline Leukemia Virus (FeLV)As early as 8 weeks, then 3-4 weeks later2 doses, 3-4 weeks apart1 dose is given a year after the last dose of the initial series, then annuallyNon-core cat vaccine.

Should test FeLV negative first. Transmitted via cat-to-cat contact. Can cause cancer, immunosuppressant

BordetellaAt 8 weeks, then 2-4 weeks later2 doses, 2-4 weeks apartAnnuallyNon-core cat vaccine.

A contagious upper respiratory condition

Does your pet’s rabies vaccine contain mercury?
Hint: If they get it at Otay Pet Vets, nope!

Did you know that the vast majority of veterinarians and virtually all vaccine clinics use rabies vaccines that contain mercury? Thimerosal is a mercury-based compound that is used as a vaccine preservative. In people and animals, mercury toxicity can cause nausea; vomiting; fatigue; difficulty walking; tremors; attention deficit; brain, lung, and kidney damage; and, at higher doses, coma and death. Mercury builds up in the body so the adverse effects of mercury are cumulative over the life of your pet.

Our primary goal is to help you to keep your beloved animal family members as healthy and happy as possible. That’s why we only use mercury-free rabies vaccines at Otay Pet Vets. Regardless of where you get your pets vaccinated, for the health of your pet, please don’t accept any rabies vaccine that contains thimerosal! If the label on the rabies vaccine does not have the designation ‘TF’ for thimerosal-free, then the vaccine contains mercury and should be avoided.